Apps for Teaching Kids Coding (Ages 5-7)

Learning computer programming can help kids develop problem-solving and critical-thinking skills. It also encourages them to be not only consumers of technology but also creators.

We have listed all the coding apps that are appropriate for young learners.

 

 

Lightbot Jr 4+ Coding Puzzles
Colorful, engaging intro to programming for young kids.  Lightbot Jr 4+ Coding Puzzles presents kids with a cute little robot, small levels comprised of blocks, and a handful of drag-and-drop programming icons. Move, turn, light, and jump comprise the core of Lightbot Jr's available commands. And when the player places these command tiles in a row, LightBot Jr moves merrily through the level, lighting up designated tiles. The player must light up the correct tiles to move on to the next level.

Devices: iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad, Android, Fire phone, Kindle Fire

 

 

Kodable Pro
Fun programming logic for kids, great resources for parents.  Teach your students the basics of computer programming in as little as 20 minutes a week with an engaging classroom curriculum. Pilot Kodable for free!

 Devices: iPad

 

 

 Daisy the Dinosaur
From the makers of Hopscotch, Daisy targets the youngest coders. The interface is similar to Hopscotch but much simpler. There is only a dinosaur to move and only basic functions to use, but for your younger students, this is an excellent introduction to programming.
 Devices: iPad

 

 

Tynker - Learn programming with visual code blocks
Although Tynker is relatively new, we definitely count it as one of our favorite coding apps. The interface looks similar to Scratch. But while Scratch was designed to program, Tynker was built to teach programming. The app features starter lesson plans, classroom management tools, and an online showcase of student-created programs. Lessons are self-paced and simple for students to follow without assistance.

Devices: iPad, Android  

 

 

ScratchJr
Tool helps kids program their first multimedia project.  Designed by MIT students and staff in 2003, Scratch is one of the first programming languages.  Students use a visual programming language made up of bricks that they drag to the workspace to animate sprites. Various types of bricks trigger loops, create variables, initiate interactivity, play sounds, and more. Teaching guides, communities and other resources available on the website will help instructors get started. You don't have to be a programming expert to introduce Scratch -- we learned right along with the students!
 Devices: iPad

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